Rare Disease Day and Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type IX (Type 9)

Today, February 28, is Rare Disease Day – and so it seems fitting to share with you today that we’ve received some new information about the specifics of FangFang’s diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta.

With osteogenesis imperfecta (OI), it is possible to receive a clinical diagnosis or a genetic diagnosis or both. A clinical diagnosis is based on observations made by a doctor of features that are associated with osteogenesis imperfecta. FangFang has had a clinical diagnosis since the early days of her life. It was made in China and confirmed in America. There are a number of different types of OI, each associated with a different genetic mutation and each having slightly different effects, and a type can only be determined with certainty via genetic testing, but guesses can be made based on clinical presentation. Because of the specifics of her presentation, FangFang has been clinically assumed to have osteogenesis imperfecta Type IV, which is generally moderate in its severity.

Osteogenesis imperfecta itself is a rare disease. The current estimate is that approximately 25,000 – 50,000 people in America have the condition. The geographically closest person to us who has OI and whom we know lives 2 hours away. That means I rely heavily on Facebook groups and connections I’ve made online within the OI community for my learning and information about how to best parent FangFang in light of her diagnosis.

Even within the umbrella label of osteogenesis imperfecta, though, different types occur with differing frequencies. And yesterday I received a phone call informing me that, while we had all assumed FangFang’s genetics tests would yield a result of Type IV osteogenesis imperfecta, that is not actually what they showed. She, in fact, has Type IX (Type 9) OI.

There is no one else in our 2,000+ member Facebook group of parents of children with OI whose child has been diagnosed with Type 9 OI. When I asked in a larger group that is open to adults with OI, as well, the responses were the same – interest, for sure, but no one else is reporting having that same diagnosis. That’s a bit of a lonely place to be!

In a worldwide database tracking reported cases of OI, there are a grand total of 16 cases ever reported of this type 9 osteogenesis imperfecta.

This is the face of someone with a truly rare disease.

We don’t really know yet all of what this means. To be honest, we probably won’t ever know. Research into everything about osteogenesis imperfecta is still so new. The bisphosphonate treatments that FangFang receives quarterly to strengthen her bones have only been around for 20 years or so. Sometimes one drug or another works better for people with a certain type – but if there is no one else with your type, there’s no way to know until you try it. FangFang’s type is so rare and newly discovered that it isn’t even listed specifically on the OI Foundation website. Really, I expect that no one knows much about it.

I have an e-mail out to the doctor who is the most likely person in America to know anything about Type 9 OI. He is no longer officially part of FangFang’s care team in Omaha (he took another position at another hospital a few months ago), but he is a good guy, and I hope he may have some information for me.

Until then, I have resorted to consulting Dr. Google – and even Dr. Google has failed me. I spent about 2 hours yesterday searching and found next to nothing available publicly. I’m aware of its rarity, its inheritance pattern, and the gene it affects. That is all. There simply is not general information about this condition available in an easily accessible form.

And so, this week (and beyond, I’m sure), I’ll be scouring medical journal articles, to which we, thankfully, have access through Matt’s position at the university. Not being a doctor, trying to read medical journal articles is not really my preferred pastime, but I want to arm myself with all the information I can find, so I can do everything possible to obtain the best care for my daughter. I hope we’ll do alright. And I hope we can be a resource for anyone coming after us.

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