A Day in the Life of a Homeschooling Mom

A blog I follow is doing a series on a “Homeschool Day in the Life.” I loved reading through some of the writers’ entries on that topic and especially reading through their current and some of their older entries and seeing how their lives had changed over time. It’s such a fun record of what life is really like during a given stage and how that evolves over the years in small changes that often pass unnoticed at the time but add up into significant shifts over time. I’d like to keep that record for my family 🙂

This year we have kiddos in 2nd grade (Miranda, age 7), 1st grade (Madeleine CaiQun, age 7), and a very, very, very loose pre-school (FangFang, age 4, and Atticus, age 3). I’m sharing about our day from last Friday.

I have been trying to get up early and spend some time doing my own Bible study before my kids are all up – but I’ve had a cold, and I wasn’t sleeping well, and in the night I re-set my alarm for 8:30 – a last possible wake-up time if a child didn’t wake me up before then 🙂 I got up around then and headed downstairs for our breakfast routine. Matt and I work together to get breakfast on the table for everyone, and while we’re eating, the big kids work on math and handwriting. Miranda is using Singapore for math this year, and she usually doesn’t need much instruction – math just clicks for her. Madeleine CaiQun uses Math-U-See, so she and I watch a DVD of instruction together every 5 or 6 days, but otherwise she just needs to do one workbook lesson each morning. As they finish, I check their work and call them back to the table to fix anything that was not correct the first time.

Once math and handwriting (our table subjects) are out of the way, the kids get some free play time. I’ll usually take this time to do any dinner prep that needs to be taken care of ahead of time, respond to some e-mails, or do some cleaning. On this particular day, I mostly did some cleaning, so our kitchen and dining room would be in better shape when our Chinese teacher arrived to help us make dumplings that afternoon.

Around 11:00 I gave the girls a 5 minute warning that we’d be starting our reading school soon. They know that means it’s time to start wrapping up, but we still had a bit of difficulty transitioning from play time back to school work. It’s easier when we have a concrete activity to do (a Cosmic Yoga show or a walk, for example), but they also love just having free play time.

For reading school, the big kids join me on the couch. More often than not, the littles join us, too, but on this day, they were fascinated by a book they got out on their own and chose to look at that together instead.

The big girls and I read through our books for Bible, History, Geography, and some Literature from our Sonlight curriculum and our readings for Black History Month. Normally we’d do Science, too, but our most recent book about Science had been a Magic School Bus book, and they’d been so excited about it that we’d tackled 5 days’ worth of reading and work all in one day! We also often do a lesson from our Language Arts book and/or Spelling, but Thursdays and Fridays get a bit tight for us with our afternoon commitments, and we were starting a bit late, so I opted not to try to get those in. We still had a pile of books to work through, though 🙂

Miranda was having a bit of a rough day. She is strong-willed, passionate, and intense – all amazing, wonderful personality traits – but sometimes it’s hard for her to settle in to what her mama wants to do at any given moment 😉 Routine helps with that but doesn’t eliminate the struggle entirely, and we continue to work and pray.

Once we finished that portion of school, it was almost lunch time. I agreed that the big girls could have a break from work and take some more time to play if they would promise to help me finish cleaning up after lunch. Lunches at our house these days tend to be leftovers, some thrown together snack type foods (veggies, fruit, yogurt, crackers, nuts, cheese, etc.) or, probably most frequently, some sort of pasta – spaghetti, ravioli, or macaroni and cheese – not the absolute healthiest, but they’re quick and easy and work for everyone! We reviewed our current Bible memory verses and some of our Chinese language learning during lunch – in particular, we were supposed to have a Happy New Year poem ready to recite, so we needed to make sure we were prepared for that!

After lunch, I reminded the girls of their promise to help clean up…and it did not exactly go how I would have desired. I needed to get the dining room table cleared and cleaned, and if the big kids are in a great, agreeable mood, they can do a decent job of picking up toys, but they’re still at an age where they often need me to help break the job down into smaller pieces and participate along with them, and the little kids are definitely still at that age. They disobeyed, I yelled, and we all needed to apologize and seek forgiveness. We managed to get it all done, and then we snuggled on the couch to read a couple Encyclopedia Brown stories before our Chinese teacher arrived.

On a normal non-Friday day, after our living room clean-up time, we’d usually have 15-45 minutes of quiet reading time, and then the kids would watch a couple shows on Netflix while I worked. Then on Mondays, Wednesdays, and most Fridays, we’d get ready to head out for Miranda’s swim practice. On his way home from work, Matt sometimes picks up the younger kids there so they don’t have to stay through the entire practice (and I don’t have to corral them all through the entire practice, because let’s just say that bringing a 3-year-old boy to swim practice is always an adventure 😉 ), but otherwise we all hang out there until we come home for dinner time. Tuesdays we have our small group, and Thursdays FangFang has PT earlier in the afternoon, so the whole reading and tv and work routine gets shifted later so it bumps up right into dinner time.

On Friday afternoons, though, our Chinese teacher comes! Normally we work on language learning, but this week we got to learn how to make dumplings!

Jenny had already made some pork dumplings ahead of time, and she had prepared some vegetarian filling to bring so we could all work together to make vegetarian dumplings to stay closer to our mostly pescetarian diet. We all loved making the dumplings, and she has promised to give me her filling recipes, so we can replicate them in the future! Then, of course, we cooked and ate them – yum!

After Jenny left, I had the big girls do their independent reading and then come discuss it with me as they finished. This is the first year in which I’m not having them read all of their readers out loud to me. Partly that’s a practical matter – as they have grown in reading ability, they’ve also grown in quantities that they read, and it saves us all time if they read quietly on their own 🙂 But also they are good enough readers now that they can read quietly and independently, which is pretty awesome!

Then I let the kiddos watch a couple tv shows. I needed to finish cleaning up from our dumpling making and then get started on dinner, so I wouldn’t be able to get in any work time, but we all need some quiet down time in the afternoon. And I was able to make our baked oatmeal and smoothie “breakfast for dinner” meal and get another dish of baked oatmeal prepared and in the refrigerator to take the next morning to a women’s ministry event at church.

The big girls and I had some conflict again that evening when I asked them to help me set the table for dinner. They didn’t want to, they said. They wouldn’t do it, they said. When I ask them to do things around the house, they feel like slaves, they said. We had a conversation about authority, teamwork, and who actually does most of the household work. One daughter seemed mollified; the other stomped up to her room.

We’d been planning to attend a Chinese New Year showcase, featuring our school district’s students who have been learning Mandarin, but once Matt got home, he and I had to have a conversation about whether that could still happen in light of all the drama of the day. The daughter who had refused to help at dinner time insisted that she would modify her behavior, and she was able to handle it, and she wanted us to go – and I really wanted us all to go. We are pretty busy, and it feels like a lot of our life consists of Matt taking the kids to a fun event while I work or me taking kids to a fun event while he works, or one of us taking some of the kids while the other stays home with another group of kids, not all of us doing things together. I had been looking forward to a fun outing for us all to enjoy together, so I was glad to be able to make it happen. We loaded everyone into the van and headed downtown for the showcase.

Matt put the little kids to bed when we got home, and the big kids stayed up just a bit longer and watched a show while I exercised on our elliptical before I put them to bed. We’ve been reading some Encyclopedia Brown stories, as well as our primary Read-Alouds, as bedtime stories. After I read to them, I prayed for them and tucked them in and came back downstairs – parenting day done – phew.

Matt and I generally try to reconnect and spend some time together after the kids are in bed. I showered, and then we chatted about our days and my women’s ministry event the next morning and just random, fun stuff while we played Upwords. Usually we go to bed at the same time, and I read to him from the book we’re reading together, but on this particular night, he still felt like he had some energy and had a painting he wanted to work on, but I was pretty wiped out. I went upstairs and climbed into bed and journaled and prayed for a little while. I’d been feeling a bit disconnected from God – I’m sure in part due to my not getting up early to spend time in the Word on my own, but also I’ve been very focused on doing things recently, less on being thoughtful and prayerful about what He could be doing and how I could and should be responding to that. I needed to spend some time wrestling with that (and realizing that it had probably played a part in our hard day, as well), and then I read for just a few minutes before I went to sleep.

Honestly, it didn’t feel like a great day. Making dumplings was super cool, and it was neat to see the Chinese New Year showcase. But the kids and I had more conflict than usual. I got a lot of cleaning done but not a lot of fun, relaxing time with the kiddos. It was a stressful day. But some days are like that. I thought about going back and choosing a different day to write about (the next day we had a lot of fun and games and puzzles and happiness!), but that seemed less genuine. The truth is that we have some really fun, encouraging days, but we also have days full of conflict and anger and hurt feelings and apologies and repentance, and they’re both real. Maybe next year my “day in the life” post will hit on a better day 🙂 Until then, this was just one day in our homeschooling life!

Another Trip to Omaha, Another Surgery

Later today, my mom and FangFang and I are heading to Omaha again in preparation for another surgery for FangFang. This time the plan is to do bilateral tibia rodding – inserting rods into both of her tibias (the main bone between the knee and the ankle). We’d talked with her surgeon last winter and spring, and he’d hoped that once her femurs were rodded, her tibias would do alright on their own, but since then she has fractured both tibias, with one of the fractures being quite significant. With that, the plan has changed. For her to continue to progress safely toward walking and other gross motor skill developments, which she very much wants to do, it will help her tremendously to have her tibias rodded. Those rods will straighten and strengthen her tibias, hopefully preventing them from fracturing so frequently, and when they do fracture, the rods will act as internal splints, lessening the severity and effect of the fractures.

I’m very much looking forward to having the surgery done. I’ll stop holding my breath and hoping not to hear that tell-tale crack every time she pulls herself up to stand on the couch and starts cruising along or scoots herself up into a low chair or tries to go up or down the stairs by herself.

I think it’s going to be safer for her, better for her ability to continue to develop her gross motor skills, and better for how her legs feel for her.

But I am sad that in order to gain all of those things, she has to endure yet another surgery. And we haven’t had great luck with fractures this last month or so. FangFang broke her right humerus just over a week ago.

And then the next day, she hurt her left arm. We weren’t sure whether it was a fracture or not, and she alternated between wanting to use it and wanting to have it splinted, and we have followed her lead on that. She seemed more confident that it was alright yesterday, so we’re hoping that’s a good sign and she’ll continue to be able to use it without issue.

Mostly I’m hoping that she won’t have all 4 limbs incapacitated at the same time. Two arms at once has been really hard, so I’m really hoping her left arm continues to feel alright!

Would you pray for our trip and for her surgery please? You could pray for these specific things –

  • Safe travels to Omaha and back.
  • My kiddos and Matt at home – Miranda, Madeleine CaiQun, and Atticus are staying home with Matt, who still has his regular teaching responsibilities this week, so the kids will be hanging out with various friends for many hours this week. Please pray for them (and for our friends), as this will be far from their normal routine, and pray for Matt, who will be working and parenting on his own for several days.
  • Successful bilateral tibia rodding – that the surgery would go well, that her surgeon would feel confident in the placement of the rods, and that she would have no complications. If you’re feeling particularly ambitious, you could pray that her surgeon is miraculously able to place FD rods, which are the type she has in her femurs, and which expand with the bone as it grows. He thinks her tibias are probably too small, and he’ll likely have to place a different type of rod, which he’d then have to replace sooner, but he still thinks that’s better than no rod. But we’ve heard from other parents that even when he expects not to be able to place FD rods, he’s sometimes able to do so, and that would be amazing.
  • Pain management – The Omaha Children’s Hospital pain management team is great, which is huge in terms of post-op care. Apart from making sure we avoid infection or actual surgical complications, pain management is really the biggest focus after surgery – and it’s a huge factor that plays into my next prayer request…
  • Discharge – We don’t know how long we’ll have to be inpatient after surgery. Assuming there are no complications, once we can get FangFang transitioned to oral pain meds, we should be able to leave and head home, and all of us do so much better here, so I’m hoping we won’t have to be in the hospital very long.
  • Emotional support in the hospital – FangFang is our ever-friendly, always joyful extrovert. But even she has a hard time after surgery. She’s hurting and sad and wants me to hold her and stay within her sight at all times. Please pray that my mom and I can care for her well not only physically but also emotionally.

And, while it feels a bit silly that I’m asking for prayers for myself as my daughter heads into surgery, would you please pray for me, too? I think it’s important to be real and honest about what my life looks like, and for those of you considering adopting a child with special needs, what life parenting a child with special needs looks like. Friends…I’m tired. We’re coming off of a week of hosting my family for Thanksgiving and caring for our 4 children, which is a lot normally, but add to that the fact that one child, for large portions of time, had zero arms available so needed an adult (mostly me) to do nearly everything for her, and I have a cold, and I have not been sleeping enough or sleeping well – it’s a lot. Physically, I’m tired. And beyond that I am emotionally weary. This will be our 4th trip to Omaha and our 3rd surgery in less than a year. I’ll be, again, leaving my other kiddos home while I travel, over Atticus’s birthday, no less, which is so hard on my mama heart. I’m tired from arguing with insurance companies; I’m tired from coordinating to get all the documentation we need for everything we pursue; I’m tired from reassuring jealous siblings who view a trip to the ER as a special “Mom date;” I’m tired from not having gotten to worship with my husband for nearly a year, as one of us is always in FangFang’s and Atticus’s classroom at church; I’m tired from coordinating logistics for all things; I’m tired from the ordinary demands of motherhood and friendship and life in general. I’m just tired. All around, I’m tired. I’m tired as I head into a week in which much will be demanded of me as a mom. Please hear me when I say, this is the life I want. Parents who knowingly adopt kids with special needs sometimes, when they express that things are hard, hear, “Well, isn’t this what you asked for?” Yes, yes it is. This is the life we’ve chosen; this is the life we want; and we wouldn’t trade it for anything. That doesn’t mean it’s always easy. I’m pressing on and persevering in the midst of all we have going on in our lives. I will continue to be the Chaos Coordinator and the Mama Bear that my kids need. But I would so appreciate your prayers for my energy, my stamina, and my heart as I do that.

I’ll keep you updated on how surgery goes and how we’re all doing as I’m able.

Surgery Tomorrow Morning

Tomorrow morning we take an important step in this journey of living life with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). FangFang is scheduled for bilateral femur rodding surgery. For those of you who would enjoy a detailed explanation, feel free to check out this link from the OI Foundation. The short version is that right now, her bone density is very low, and her right femur has significant bowing (curving). That means that if she were to try to pull to a stand (something she has been starting to attempt recently), chances are high that her femur would snap. Try to imagine for a moment the pain that would be involved in a significant break of this largest bone in your body, and you’ll understand why we’d like to avoid that scenario. Her left femur fractured about 10 months ago in China, and she had a rod placed in that leg at that time, but it will be replaced during this surgery, and her right femur will be rodded for the first time. These rods will act as internal splints, straightening the bones, giving them added strength and stability, and lessening the severity of any fractures that do occur in the future.

FangFang’s orthopedic surgeon recommended this course of action when we saw him in January, and it is the consensus of the other parents with whom we’ve spoken that it is absolutely the best choice for her. And so, instead of spring break on the beach or exploring a fun area nearby or just enjoying some quality family time at home, we have spring break: bilateral femur rodding edition.

My mom and FangFang and I made the 5 hour drive to Omaha this afternoon and got settled into our hotel room, where we hope to get some sleep before an early hospital check-in tomorrow morning.

Would you please pray for us this week as we tackle surgery and these first few days of recovery? In particular, these are some things for which we’d very much appreciate prayer –

  • that the surgery itself goes well. The surgeons performing her surgery are some of the very best surgeons in the world who specialize in caring for children with OI, and they have done this exact same operation innumerable times, and we have full confidence in them, but no surgery is ever routine when it’s for your child.
  • that we are able to manage her pain – both physical and potentially emotional – well over the next few days. Physical pain after this particular surgery is intense, and we, as well as the nurses involved in her care, will need to stay ahead of her pain with the best medications for her. Additionally, we’ve done all we can to explain what’s going to happen and read books and show her pictures, and I’m as confident as I can be for a 3-year-old who has been exposed to English for just over 3 months that she’s well-prepared, but it’s hard to know how much she understands. She’s going to wake up after surgery with an epidural and double leg splints. She’s such a happy kiddo, and I’m hoping she won’t be too distraught by her situation this week.

  • that my mom and I are able to comfort and entertain her well this week. She’s going to be in pain, and she’s going to have very limited mobility. We’re going to need to be creative and hands on in our parenting (and grandparenting) to care for her well, and while I’m hoping for some bits of down time, I don’t really know what to expect, and I know I need to be prepared for some long days and nights.
  • that Matt and our other 3 kids can have fun together during this week at home. Honestly, I think he has the harder parenting job this week, caring for 3 kids by himself 24/7 (except for brief breaks offered by a friend, for which I am SO thankful – having a couple hours to himself to run to the gym is going to make his job so much easier!).

  • that we can head home early. I’ve been told that if everything goes well, we can hope for discharge on Thursday or Friday, then they’d like us to spend another night in town, and we’d be able to head home the next day. I’d really like to be able to head home ASAP. I don’t enjoy being away from Matt and the rest of our kids, and I think FangFang will be much happier at home with her brother and sisters than stuck in a hospital room. Even tonight, as she was falling asleep in her hotel pack ‘n’ play, she repeated several times, “Night night, Atta.”
  • that we’re able, as a family, to care for FangFang well even as we return home. I really don’t know what these next few weeks will look like, and I want to be flexible with our daily routines and with school and with my expectations of what things will look like, and I hope we can all be selfless in our care for her during her recovery.
  • that the rods do their job well. FangFang very much wants to be able to stand, and we believe (and all the medical professionals with whom we interact believe) that having rods in her femurs will help her to do so safely, and we hope that is the case.

I’ll keep you informed as I’m able. Thanks so much for joining us in prayer as we take this step forward with our baby girl!

We Made It to Hong Kong! Plus Some Plane Ride Reflections

We made it to Hong Kong! Our flight landed on time around 6:00 a.m. local time this morning (Friday), and we had a full day of adjusting to local time and sightseeing thereafter.

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It was awesome – but I have been awake since something like 3:00 this morning and got only about 5 hours of (frequently interrupted, not very good) sleep, and that was after a week or so of limited sleep as the preparations for our travel intensified. It’s now a little after 9:00 pm Hong Kong time, and I am exhausted. Everyone else is already asleep. Tomorrow I’ll try to write more about our travels and day one in Hong Kong, but for tonight, I’m going to try to get some sleep! However, I will leave you with these reflections that I wrote on our flight –

I’m writing this post from somewhere over northern Asia, about 10 hours into our flight from Newark to Hong Kong. Anyone who has asked me recently how they could pray for us in our travels knows that I’ve been nervous about the flights – I’ve flown many times before, and I know the probabilities of anything going wrong are extremely small, but still, I’ve been nervous. I’m feeling calmer now that we have one flight down and are over halfway through our second.

I’ve been trying to remind myself of the truths that I know – looking at Psalm 103 and its truths about who God is, remembering that God tells us in Psalm 46 that He is our refuge and strength, and reciting Deuteronomy 31:6 – one of the first verses I ever memorized – to myself – “Be strong and courageous. Do not fear or be in dread of them, for it is the Lord your God who goes with you. He will not leave you or forsake you.” A good friend also texted me while Madeleine CaiQun and I were having dinner in the St. Louis airport and told me that she’d been meditating on Psalm 40 and David recounting how God had delivered him in the past, so he could trust Him to do it again.

I really appreciated that and spent some time reading and praying through Psalm 40 on our first flight. It was particularly poignant to me, because on Tuesday night, less than 24 hours before we were to leave to begin our journey to China, I connected with a woman who played a huge part in FangFang’s story, a woman and a part I hadn’t known existed. There is another adoption agency working in China that has a partnership relationship with FangFang’s orphanage. As such, they send medical teams there to evaluate the children’s needs and gather more information about them for prospective adoptive families, and they provide assistance in caring for the children and in preparing their files so that they are eligible for international adoption. This agency sent a team to FangFang’s orphanage in January, and this woman was part of that team. While she was there, she saw FangFang, and she talked with the orphanage about it perhaps being a good idea to transfer her to the foster home at which she has been residing for the last 9 months. The transformation in FangFang’s development and in her demeanor since moving from the orphanage to the foster home is nothing short of amazing, and this woman was part of bringing that about. And what’s more, all of this was happening just as we were seeing a blog post advocating for FangFang and praying about pursuing adopting her and praying that, regardless, she would have a family and that she would receive the best care possible for her while she remained in China. It was around that very same time that God was putting into motion all that would need to happen for FangFang to move to what I believe is the best foster home in the country for caring for children with osteogenesis imperfecta and, we believe, calling us to be her family.

I don’t believe any of this is accidental. I think God was answering our prayers 11 months ago, and I interpret the timing of this connection I made the other night as a reassurance from God that He is at work in FangFang’s story. He hears and has been answering prayers for her for months now. That doesn’t mean He’s a genie and that her life will be perfect and anything I request on her (or my) behalf is going to happen. How could it? In that case, she would never have endured the staggering loss of her first family. But it does mean that He is involved in her story, and because I can see the fingerprints of His faithfulness in her past, I can trust that He is going to continue to be faithful in His care for her in the future. My hope is that that means safe travels around and home from China! But regardless, I am honored to be a part of His work in this precious child’s life.

Here We Go! Some Specifics and Some Prayer Requests

The wheels are in motion for our trip, both literally and figuratively – my mom is on her way here so that she can spend the next 2.5 weeks with Matt and Miranda and Atticus. Tomorrow afternoon Madeleine CaiQun and I will head to St. Louis to begin our journey to China.

As we look toward our trip, I’m feeling acutely the need for prayer, moreso even than with our last adoption trip. Perhaps it’s that I know more this time – the more I know, the more I realize that I cannot make things happen all in my own power. It’s also that I’m traveling without Matt this time – I am so thankful that my brother and sister-in-law will be there with me, but it will not be the same as having Matt (and my other kiddos) there, too. FangFang’s medical needs are also more significant than Madeleine CaiQun’s were. Adoption trips are always intense, but I am especially feeling the weight of that this time. Would you pray with and for us? Here are some specific requests:

  • Please pray for our safety in traveling (and in remaining home). I know this is morbid, and I know that probabilities are small, but my biggest fear is that the plane will crash or that Atticus will dive head-first off the table, and we won’t all see each other again this side of heaven. Please pray that we all survive the next 2.5 weeks.
  • Please pray for Matt and Miranda and Atticus and my mom. I’ve done a lot to make their time as easy as possible – freezing meals and leaving gifts – but these next couple weeks are going to be a significant departure from normalcy for everyone. Please pray that they have fun together and do alright.
  • Please pray for all the travel logistics. These are not insignificant. CaiQun and I have 2 separate flight itineraries (one domestic; one international), meaning that the airlines don’t really have to work well with us for the international itinerary if our domestic flight gets delayed tomorrow and we miss the international flight. Then on Sunday, we’ll be taking a taxi from our Hong Kong hotel to the train station, where we’ll catch a train to Guangzhou. We then need to meet up with a van our agency is sending to take us from the first Guangzhou train station to the second, and we’ll take a train from that second station to Nanning. Please pray that all goes smoothly in all of this craziness.
  • Please pray for little FangFang’s heart. Her world is about to change dramatically, and we pray that her heart be prepared for and open to us as her family. We pray that we will be able to show her some love and fun early on. Please pray especially for her bond to me – children joining their families often can only handle bonding to one adult at a time, and my brother and sister-in-law are awesome, but it would be ideal for her to form her primary bond with me first. I am anticipating some heavy grieving from her as she leaves the nannies from her foster home and comes to us.
  • Please pray for Madeleine CaiQun. She has some anxiety about returning to China. My prayer is that this trip is a beautiful experience for her, but I’m not certain how it will go. Please pray for her processing her return to her birth culture, as well as her adjustment to becoming a big sister again. Please pray that she’ll allow my brother and sister-in-law to care for her at times, especially when FangFang is needing me.
  • Please pray for my endurance, patience, graciousness, and love. I expect these to be some of the most intense parenting weeks of my life as I mother 2 girls through huge experiences in their own lives.
  • Please pray for everyone’s health. I’ve had a persistent sore throat and just feel generally yucky, which I suspect is nothing significant, but I’m heading in to get it checked out this afternoon, just to be sure before I leave the country and my access to Western medical care. More significantly, please pray that we make it home without any of FangFang’s bones fracturing. I’m traveling with splinting supplies, but we won’t have such great access to medical resources in China to review my splinting or get x-rays easily or provide care in the event that a fracture would be truly serious.
  • Please pray for my brother and sister-in-law. I am so thankful that they are joining us on this journey. Please pray for the 3 of us adults to work well together through what will be, at times, a stressful trip. Please pray for our communication and for us to have great grace with each other.
  • Please pray for wisdom in decision-making. We are going to need to make the call of whether to request permission to visit FangFang’s orphanage. We will have to decide how much sightseeing seems wise and how much we’re going to need to just hunker down in our hotel room. There’s still some question of where we’ll stay in Guangzhou – there’s a serviced apartment building just across the street from the hotel at which our agency has people stay, and staying there would save us a ton of money and give us more space, and that’s where I’ve been planning for weeks to have us stay…but someone staying there last week gave it a pretty unfavorable review, and I’m still not 100% certain how we’re going to handle that situation.
  • Speaking of money, please pray for financial provision. We’ve applied with one more grant organization, and it would be a huge blessing to get some funding from them. We’ve borrowed money to pay the rest of the costs associated with this adoption, and please hear me when I say that this debt is worth it. We go into debt for houses and cars; bringing a child into a family is of so much more importance than those physical things. But needing to pay back thousands of dollars of debt at the same time that we are incurring thousands of dollars of medical expenses for FangFang’s initial medical care is going to be tough.
  • Please pray for these next 24 hours or so at home – I still have some packing to do and miscellaneous tasks to finish (paying bills, etc), but I’d also like to spend some good quality time with the rest of my family, whom I won’t see for so many days.
  • Please pray for all of our hearts as we are separated as a family for the next couple weeks. This is so hard for me.
  • Please pray that we can honor our God as we interact with various people in China. Please pray that we are respectful and loving in all we do.
  • Please pray that we keep our priorities straight and focus on what’s truly important about and throughout this trip.

I’m going to share the basics of our itinerary below so you’ll know a bit more of how to pray each day. Keep in mind that we’ll be 14 hours ahead of Central Time – so, for instance, our meeting FangFang on the morning of Monday, December 12 is still going to be your evening of Sunday, December 11. If you stay up late enough and I have good enough Internet and a calm enough baby, you may get to see some pictures – Sunday nights are a time of rejoicing in the China adoption community 🙂

Here’s our basic schedule –

  • Wednesday, December 7 – Madeleine CaiQun and I fly from St. Louis to Newark, where we’ll meet up with my brother Daniel and sister-in-law Sharon.
  • Thursday, December 8 – We have a 1:00 AM flight from Newark to Hong Kong.
  • Friday, December 9 – Because of the long flight and the time change, we leave at 1:00 AM on Thursday but don’t arrive in Hong Kong until 6:00 AM on Friday. We’ll head to our hotel to drop off our bags and then try to stave off jetlag by going out and sightseeing for the day.
  • Saturday, December 10 – We’ll have another day of sightseeing in Hong Kong and continuing to adjust to the time difference.
  • Sunday, December 11 – We’ll travel from Hong Kong to Nanning via the rather complicated route I detailed above.
  • Monday, December 12 – We’ll meet and take custody of FangFang.
  • Tuesday, December 13 – We’ll finalize FangFang’s adoption.
  • Wednesday, December 14 – Thursday, December 15 – We’ll hang out in Nanning while we wait for FangFang’s passport to be ready. We may take a trip to her city to visit the orphanage from which she’s from. We may do some sightseeing in Nanning. Or we may need to spend a lot of time building bonds and connections in the hotel room.
  • Friday, December 16 – We’ll travel from Nanning to Guangzhou.
  • Saturday, December 17 – We’ll have FangFang’s medical exam.
  • Sunday, December 18 – Monday, December 19 – We’ll hang out in Guangzhou, maybe doing some sightseeing, while we wait for the results of FangFang’s medical exam.
  • Tuesday, December 20 – We’ll have our consulate appointment to finish the process of applying for FangFang’s visa to enter the United States.
  • Wednesday, December 21 – FangFang’s visa should be ready.
  • Thursday, December 22 – We’ll take the train from Guangzhou to Hong Kong and then board a flight from Hong Kong back to Newark. The time change works in reverse this time – we’ll leave Hong Kong around 6:00 PM but arrive in Newark around 9:00 PM. My dad will fly out to Newark to meet us, and he and I and the girls will spend the night in a hotel.
  • Friday, December 23 – My dad and the girls and I will fly back to St. Louis, and we should arrive back in Columbia mid-afternoon.

Solid internet access is never a guarantee in China, and of course, actually caring for FangFang (and Madeleine CaiQun) is going to be my priority, but I do hope to be able to post regularly and keep you all updated, and should you want to send encouragement or prayers, I should be able to get them while there. Thank you for praying, friends!